This website is for teachers (and parents) who have children that are extra difficult to connect with.

Many of our students have experienced trauma. Trauma has affected them so much that they don't function like other kids. Please read on.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 or http://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/#

" Babies and young children systems are flooded with potent stress hormones which help in the event of needing the 5 fffff’s, but they are not good to have at high levels for too long. Imagine the feeling when you truly believe you have lost your wallet with all your cards and money in. You feel a bit faint, your brain is whirring, your heart racing, breathing is shallow, and you may get the urge to empty your bowels or bladder. Hopefully, this may only lasts for the usual 45 minute cycle for those who are not traumatized."


Evans, Jane. "Children Who Experience Early Childhood Trauma Do Not 'Just Get Over It' - Social Work Helper." Social Work Helper. Social Work Helper, 08 Oct. 2014. Web. 09 Aug. 2016.

Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD)

Definition:  According to Web MD,  "Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) is a condition found in children who may have received grossly negligent care and do not form a healthy emotional attachment with their primary caregivers -- usually their mothers -- before age 5."

For more, click here: Web MD RAD

Top three strategies/suggestions:

1. Create a "safe space" in your classroom

2. Stay calm. Ask the child what he or she is nervous, frustrated, or angry about. Ask what you can do to help.

3. As much as possible,  give no negative input. Only give positive attention for things done well or correctly.


Please go to the RAD page (See above) for more information and a list of what YOU can do.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Definition:   According to Web MD,  "Post-traumatic stress disorder, also known as PTSD, is among only a few mental illnesses that are triggered by a disturbing outside event, unlike other psychiatric disorders such as clinical depression."

For more information, click here: Web MD PTSD.

Top three strategies/suggestions:

1. Create a "safe space" in your classroom

2. Stay calm. Ask the child what he or she is nervous, frustrated, or angry about. Ask what you can do to help.

3. As much as possible,  give no negative input. Only give positive attention for things done well or correctly. 
 

Please go to the PTSD page (See above.) for more information and a list of what YOU can do.

 

A new study by the California Department of Public Health has found that childhood trauma has a long-term impact on a child’s life, and the consequences are far more prevalent among children from low-income families.
See more.

Anxiety

Definition:    According to Web MD, " Generalized anxiety disorder occurs when you feel worried and stressed about many everyday events and activities. Often the things you are worried about are small or not important. This type of worry disrupts your life most days. Everyone gets worried or anxious sometimes. But people with generalized anxiety disorder experience more than normal everyday worries.

For more information, click here: Web MD Anxiety

Top three suggested strategies/suggestions:

1.  Be careful not to overreact, and don’t give excessive reassurance.

2. Understand (and help the child understand) the physical signs of fear.

3. Give them plenty of information.


Please go to the Anxiety page (See above.) for more information and a list of what YOU can do.

1. Kids who have experienced trauma aren’t trying to push your buttons.

2. Kids who have been through trauma worry about what’s going to happen next.

3. Even if the situation doesn’t seem that bad to you, it’s how the child feels that matters.

4. Trauma isn’t always associated with violence.

5. You don’t need to know exactly what caused the trauma to be able to help.

6. Kids who experience trauma need to feel they’re good at something and can influence the world.

7. There’s a direct connection between stress and learning.

8. Self-regulation can be a major challenge for students suffering from trauma.

9. It’s OK to ask kids point-blank what you can do to help them make it through the day.

10. You can support kids with trauma even when they’re outside your classroom.


We Are Teachers Staff. "WeAreTeachers: 10 Things About Childhood Trauma Every Teacher Needs to Know." 10 Things About Childhood Trauma Every Teacher Needs to Know. We Are Teachers, n.d. Web. 09 Aug. 2016. 

(C) 2016 RAD, PTSD, Anxiety, and Angry Kids by Erin Beckett